Books published by Yale University Press at best prices | Best of Yale University Press (769 books)

Fundamentals of Physics I - Mechanics, Relativity, and Thermodynamics, Expanded Edition (Open Yale Courses)

Fundamentals of Physics I - Mechanics, Relativity, and Thermodynamics, Expanded Edition (Open Yale Courses)

A beloved introductory physics textbook, now including exercises and an answer key, explains the concepts essential for thorough scientific understanding In this concise book, R. Shankar, a well-known physicist and contagiously enthusiastic educator, explains the essential concepts of Newtonian mechanics, special relativity, waves, fluids, thermodynamics, and statistical mechanics. Now in an expanded edition-complete with problem sets and answers for course use or self-study-this work provides an ideal introduction for college-level students of physics, chemistry, and engineering; for AP Physics students; and for general readers interested in advances in the sciences. The book begins at the simplest level, develops the basics, and reinforces fundamentals, ensuring a solid foundation in the principles and methods of physics.

Art & Its Histories - The Changing Status of the Artist V 2 (Paper) (Art and Its Histories Series)

Art & Its Histories - The Changing Status of the Artist V 2 (Paper) (Art and Its Histories Series)

This book focuses attention on the theme of the artist and especially the changing status of the artist in the early modern period. In a series of case studies-some devoted to a single artist and others dealing more broadly with artistic practice-the authors explore and question the widely held notion that the later fifteenth and sixteenth centuries witnessed the emergence of the modern idea of the artist. After an introductory discussion of some of the fundamental assumptions in modern Western culture about the artist as genius, the book investigates artists in Renaissance Italy, the various claims for status that they made, and the claims made on their behalf. The book then expands traditional art history's focus on Italy and examines artists and art production in Germany and the Netherlands during the later fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. In two concluding case studies of Northern European artists of slightly later periods-Vermeer and Watteau-the authors consider factors that influence the status and reputation of artists during their lifetimes and after their death. This is the second of six volumes in the series Art and Its Histories, created to accompany the Open University undergraduate course of the same title.

Rs. 20719.0

The Challenge of the Avant-Garde - Art & Its Histories Vol IV (Art and its Histories Series)

The Challenge of the Avant-Garde - Art & Its Histories Vol IV (Art and its Histories Series)

This volume traces the challenge posed to the academic canon by the emergent avant-garde of the early and mid-19th century. It considers the shifts in its development through the later 19th and 20th century and its eventual incorporation as a form of modern canon by the eve of World War II.

Rs. 8448.3

Design - The Invention of Desire

Design - The Invention of Desire

A compelling defense for the importance of design and how it shapes our behavior, our emotions, and our lives Design has always prided itself on being relevant to the world it serves, but interest in design was once limited to a small community of design professionals. Today, books on "design thinking" are best sellers, and computer and Web-based tools have expanded the definition of who practices design. Looking at objects, letterforms, experiences, and even theatrical performances, award-winning author Jessica Helfand asserts that understanding design's purpose is more crucial than ever. Design is meaningful not because it is pretty but because it is an intrinsically humanist discipline, tethered to the very core of why we exist. For example, as designers collaborate with developing nations on everything from more affordable lawn mowers to cleaner drinking water, they must take into consideration the full range of a given community's complex social needs. Advancing a conversation that is unfolding around the globe, Helfand offers an eye-opening look at how designed things make us feel as well as how-and why-they motivate our behavior.

Rs. 1660.0

Aldo Rossi and the Spirit of Architecture

Aldo Rossi and the Spirit of Architecture

An essential new look at the Italian architect, writer, and designer whose work paved the way for the postmodern movement This crucial reassessment of Aldo Rossi's (1931-1997) architecture simultaneously examines his writings, drawings, and product design, including the coffeepots and clocks he designed for the Italian firm Alessi. The first Italian to receive the Pritzker Prize, Rossi rejected modernism, seeking instead a form of architecture that could transcend the aesthetic legacy of Fascism in postwar Italy. Rossi was a visionary who did not allow contemporary trends to dominate his thinking. His baroque sensibility and poetic approach, found both in his buildings and in important texts like The Architecture of the City, inspired the critic Ada Louise Huxtable to describe him as "a poet who happens to be an architect." Diane Ghirardo explores different categories of structures-monuments, public buildings, cultural institutions, theaters, and cemeteries-drawing significantly on previously unpublished archival materials and always keeping Rossi's own texts in the forefront. By delving into the relationships among Rossi's multifaceted life, his rich body of work, and his own reflections, this book provides a critical new understanding of Rossi's buildings and the place of architecture in postwar Italy.

Rs. 4505.0

Jihad - The Rise of Militant Islam in Central Asia

Jihad - The Rise of Militant Islam in Central Asia

Biological diversity is considered one of today's most urgent environmental concerns, yet the term was first coined only twenty-five years ago. Why did the concept of biological diversity so quickly capture public attention and emerge as a banner issue for the environmental movement? In this book, Timothy J. Farnham explores for the first time the historical roots of biological diversity, tracing the evolution of the term as well as the history of the conservation traditions that contributed to its rapid acceptance and popularity. Biological diversity is understood today as consisting of three components--species diversity, genetic diversity, and ecosystem diversity. Farnham finds that these three tiers coincided with three earlier, disparate conservation traditions that converged when the cause of preserving biological diversity was articulated. He tells the stories of these different historical foundations, recounts how the term came into the environmental lexicon, and shows how the evolution of the idea of biological diversity reflects an evolution of American attitudes toward the natural world.

Rs. 4090.0

From Jesus to Christ - The Origins of the New Testament Images of Jesus 2e (Yale Nota Bene)

From Jesus to Christ - The Origins of the New Testament Images of Jesus 2e (Yale Nota Bene)

In this exciting book, Paula Fredriksen explains the variety of New Testament images of Jesus by exploring the ways that the new Christian communities interpreted his mission and message in light of the delay of the Kingdom he had preached. A new introduction reviews the most recent scholarship on Jesus and its implications for both history and theology. "Brilliant and enjoyable. . . . Magisterial."-Geza Vermes, Times Literary Supplement "Brilliant and lucidly written, full of original and fascinating insights."-Reginald H. Fuller, Journal of the American Academy of Religion "This is a first-rate work of a first-rate historian."-James D. Tabor, Journal of Religion "Fredriksen confronts her documents-principally the writings of the New Testament-as an archaeologist would an especially rich complex site. With great care she distinguishes the literary images from historical fact. As she does so, she explains the images of Jesus in terms of the strategies and purposes of the writers Paul, Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John."-Thomas D'Evelyn, Christian Science Monitor

Nature`s Giants – The Biology and Evolution of the World`s Largest Lifeforms

Nature`s Giants – The Biology and Evolution of the World`s Largest Lifeforms

A beautifully illustrated exploration of the science behind the awe-inspiring giants of past and present The colossal plants and animals of our world-dinosaurs, whales, and even trees-are a source of unending fascination, and their sheer scale can be truly impressive. Size is integral to the way that organisms experience the world: a puddle that a human being would step over without thinking is an entire world to thousands of microscopic rotifers. But why are creatures the size that they are? Why aren't bugs the size of elephants, or whales the size of goldfish? In this lavishly illustrated new book, biologist Graeme Ruxton explains how and why nature's giants came to be so big-for example, how decreased oxygen levels limited the size of insects and how island isolation allowed small-bodied animals to evolve larger body sizes. Through a diverse array of examples, from huge butterflies to giant squid, Ruxton explores the physics, biology, and evolutionary drivers behind organism size, showing what it's like to live large.

Rs. 1938.0

Joe Louis – Hard Times Man

Joe Louis – Hard Times Man

Joe Louis defended his heavyweight boxing title an astonishing twenty-five times and reigned as world champion for more than eleven years. He got more column inches of newspaper coverage in the 1930s than FDR did. His racially and politically charged defeat of Max Schmeling in 1938 made Louis a national hero. But as important as his record is what he meant to African-Americans: at a time when the boxing ring was the only venue where black and white could meet on equal terms, Louis embodied all their hopes for dignity and equality. Through meticulous research and first-hand interviews, acclaimed historian and biographer Randy Roberts presents Louis, and his impact on sport and country, in a way never before accomplished. Roberts reveals an athlete who carefully managed his public image, and whose relationships with both the black and white communities-including his relationships with mobsters-were far more complex than the simplistic accounts of heroism and victimization that have dominated previous biographies. Richly researched and utterly captivating, this extraordinary biography presents the full range of Joe Louis's power in and out of the boxing ring.

Rs. 2609.45

Why Liberalism Failed (Politics and Culture Series)

Why Liberalism Failed (Politics and Culture Series)

"One of the most important political Books of 2018."-Rod Dreher, American Conservative Of the three dominant ideologies of the twentieth century-fascism, communism, and liberalism-only the last remains. This has created a peculiar situation in which liberalism's proponents tend to forget that it is an ideology and not the natural end-state of human political evolution. As Patrick Deneen argues in this provocative book, liberalism is built on a foundation of contradictions: it trumpets equal rights while fostering incomparable material inequality; its legitimacy rests on consent, yet it discourages civic commitments in favor of privatism; and in its pursuit of individual autonomy, it has given rise to the most far-reaching, comprehensive state system in human history. Here, Deneen offers an astringent warning that the centripetal forces now at Work on our political culture are not superficial flaws but inherent features of a system whose success is generating its own failure.

Humour

Humour

A compelling guide to the fundamental place of Humour and comedy within Western culture-by one of its greatest exponents Written by an acknowledged master of comedy, this study reflects on the nature of Humour and the functions it serves. Why do we laugh? What are we to make of the sheer variety of laughter, from braying and cackling to sniggering and chortling? Is Humour subversive, or can it defuse dissent? Can we define wit? Packed with illuminating ideas and a good many excellent jokes, the book critically examines various well-known theories of humour, including the idea that it springs from incongruity and the view that it reflects a mildly sadistic form of superiority to others. Drawing on a wide range of Literary and philosophical sources, Terry Eagleton moves from Aristotle and Aquinas to Hobbes, Freud, and Bakhtin, looking in particular at the psychoanalytical mechanisms underlying Humour and its social and political evolution over the centuries.

Rs. 1284.0

Culture in Nazi Germany

Culture in Nazi Germany

A fresh and insightful History of how the German arts-and-letters scene was transformed under the Nazis Culture was integral to the smooth Running of the Third Reich. In the years preceding WWII, a wide variety of artistic forms were used to instill a Nazi ideology in the German People and to manipulate the public perception of Hitler's enemies. During the war, the Arts were closely tied to the propaganda machine that promoted the cause of Germany's Military campaigns. Michael H. Kater's engaging and deeply researched account of artistic culture within Nazi Germany considers how the German arts-and-letters scene was transformed when the Nazis came to power. With a broad purview that ranges widely across music, literature, film, theater, the press, and visual arts, Kater details the struggle between creative autonomy and political control as he looks at what became of German artists and their Work both during and subsequent to Nazi rule.

Rs. 1874.0

A Little History of Archaeology (Little Histories)

A Little History of Archaeology (Little Histories)

The thrilling History of archaeological adventure, with tales of danger, debate, audacious explorers, and astonishing discoveries around the globe What is archaeology? The word may bring to mind images of golden pharaohs and lost civilizations, or Neanderthal skulls and Ice Age cave art. Archaeology is all of these, but also far more: the only Science to encompass the entire span of human history-more than three million years! This Little History tells the riveting stories of some of the great archaeologists and their amazing discoveries around the globe: Ancient Egyptian tombs, Mayan ruins, the first colonial settlements at Jamestown, mysterious Stonehenge, the incredibly preserved Pompeii, and many, many more. In forty brief, exciting chapters, the book recounts archaeology's development from its eighteenth-century origins to its twenty-first-century technological advances, including remote sensing capabilities and satellite imagery techniques that have revolutionized the field. Shining light on the most intriguing Events in the History of the field, this absolutely up-to-date book illuminates archaeology's controversies, discoveries, heroes and scoundrels, global sites, and newest methods for curious Readers of every age.

The Club – Johnson, Boswell, and the Friends Who Shaped an Age

The Club – Johnson, Boswell, and the Friends Who Shaped an Age

Prize-winning biographer Leo Damrosch tells the story of "the Club," a group of extraordinary writers, artists, and thinkers who gathered weekly at a London tavern In 1763, the painter Joshua Reynolds proposed to his friend Samuel Johnson that they invite a few friends to join them every Friday at the Turk's Head Tavern in London to dine, drink, and talk until midnight. Eventually the group came to include among its members Edmund Burke, Adam Smith, Edward Gibbon, and James Boswell. It was known simply as "the Club." In this captivating book, Leo Damrosch brings alive a brilliant, competitive, and eccentric cast of characters. With the friendship of the "odd couple" Samuel Johnson and James Boswell at the heart of his narrative, Damrosch conjures up the precarious, exciting, and often brutal World of late eighteenth-century Britain. This is the story of an extraordinary group of People whose ideas helped to shape their age, and our own.

Rs. 1540.0

Arabs – A 3,000–Year History of Peoples, Tribes and Empires

Arabs – A 3,000–Year History of Peoples, Tribes and Empires

A riveting, comprehensive History of the Arab peoples and tribes that explores the role of language as a cultural touchstone This kaleidoscopic book Covers almost 3,000 years of Arab History and shines a light on the footloose Arab peoples and tribes who conquered lands and disseminated their language and culture over vast distances. Tracing this process to the origins of the Arabic language, rather than the advent of Islam, Tim Mackintosh-Smith begins his narrative more than a thousand years before Muhammad and focuses on how Arabic, both spoken and written, has functioned as a vital source of shared cultural identity over the millennia. Mackintosh-Smith reveals how linguistic developments-from pre-Islamic Poetry to the growth of script, Muhammad's use of writing, and the later problems of printing Arabic-have helped and hindered the progress of Arab history, and investigates how, even in today's politically fractured post-Arab Spring environment, Arabic itself is still a source of unity and disunity.

Rs. 1905.0

The Shape of a Life – One Mathematician`s Search for the Universe`s Hidden Geometry

The Shape of a Life – One Mathematician`s Search for the Universe`s Hidden Geometry

A Fields medalist recounts his lifelong transnational effort to uncover the geometric shape-the Calabi-Yau manifold-that may store the hidden dimensions of our universe. Harvard geometer and Fields medalist Shing-Tung Yau has provided a mathematical foundation for string theory, offered new insights into black holes, and mathematically demonstrated the stability of our universe. In this autobiography, Yau reflects on his improbable journey to becoming one of the world's most distinguished mathematicians. Beginning with an impoverished childhood in China and Hong Kong, Yau takes Readers through his doctoral studies at Berkeley during the height of the Vietnam War protests, his Fields Medal-winning proof of the Calabi conjecture, his return to China, and his pioneering Work in geometric analysis. This new branch of geometry, which Yau built up with his friends and colleagues, has paved the way for solutions to several important and previously intransigent problems. With complicated ideas explained for a broad audience, this book offers Readers not only insights into the life of an eminent mathematician, but also an accessible way to understand advanced and highly abstract concepts in Mathematics and theoretical physics.

Rs. 1620.0

Delayed Response – The Art of Waiting from the Ancient to the Instant World

Delayed Response – The Art of Waiting from the Ancient to the Instant World

A celebration of waiting throughout history, and of its importance for connection, understanding, and intimacy in human Communication We have always been conscious of the wait for life-changing messages, whether it be the Time it takes to receive a text message from your love, for a soldier's Family to learn News from the front, or for a space probe to deliver data from the far reaches of the Solar system. In this book in praise of wait times, award-winning author Jason Farman passionately argues that the delay between call and answer has always been an important part of the message. Traveling backward from our current era of Twitter and texts, Farman shows how societies have worked to eliminate waiting in Communication and how they have interpreted those times' meanings. Exploring seven eras and objects of waiting-including pneumatic mail tubes in New York, Elizabethan wax seals, and Aboriginal Australian message sticks-Farman offers a new mindset for waiting. In a rebuttal to the demand for instant communication, Farman makes a powerful case for why good things can come to those who wait.

Rs. 1613.0

The Master and His Emissary – The Divided Brain and the Making of the Western World

The Master and His Emissary – The Divided Brain and the Making of the Western World

A new edition of the bestselling classic - published with a special introduction to mark its 10th anniversary This pioneering account sets out to understand the structure of the human brain - the place where mind meets matter. Until recently, the left hemisphere of our brain has been seen as the `rational' side, the superior partner to the right. But is this distinction true? Drawing on a vast body of experimental research, Iain McGilchrist argues while our left brain makes for a wonderful servant, it is a very poor master. As he shows, it is the right side which is the more reliable and insightful. Without it, our World would be mechanistic - stripped of depth, colour and value.

Rs. 1182.0

The Misinformation Age – How False Beliefs Spread

The Misinformation Age – How False Beliefs Spread

The social dynamics of "alternative facts": why what you believe depends on who you know Why should we care about having true beliefs? And why do demonstrably false beliefs persist and spread despite bad, even fatal, consequences for the People who hold them? Philosophers of Science Cailin O'Connor and James Weatherall argue that social factors, rather than individual psychology, are what's essential to understanding the spread and persistence of false beliefs. It might seem that there's an obvious reason that true beliefs matter: false beliefs will hurt you. But if that's right, then why is it (apparently) irrelevant to many People whether they believe true things or not? The Misinformation Age, written for a political era riven by "fake news," "alternative facts," and disputes over the validity of everything from climate change to the size of inauguration crowds, shows convincingly that what you believe depends on who you know. If social forces explain the persistence of false belief, we must understand how those forces Work in order to fight misinformation effectively.

Rs. 1506.0

Fiber – The Coming Tech Revolution and Why America Might Miss It

Fiber – The Coming Tech Revolution and Why America Might Miss It

The World of fiber optic connections reaching neighborhoods, homes, and businesses will represent as great a change from what came before as the advent of electricity. The virtually unlimited amounts of data we'll be able to send and receive through fiber optic connections will enable a degree of virtual presence that will radically transform Health care, education, urban Administration and services, agriculture, retail sales, and offices. Yet all of those transformations will pale compared with the innovations and new industries that we can't even imagine today. In a fascinating account combining policy expertise and compelling on-the-ground reporting, Susan Crawford reveals how the giant corporations that control cable and Internet access in the United States use their tremendous lobbying power to tilt the playing field against competition, holding back the infrastructure improvements necessary for the country to move forward. And she shows how a few cities and towns are fighting monopoly power to bring the next technological revolution to their communities.

Rs. 2038.0

Ganges – The Many Pasts of an Indian River

Ganges – The Many Pasts of an Indian River

A sweeping, interdisciplinary History of the world's third-largest river, a potent symbol across South Asia and the Hindu diaspora Originating in the Himalayas and flowing into the Bay of Bengal, the Ganges is India's most important and sacred river. In this unprecedented work, historian Sudipta Sen tells the story of the Ganges, from the communities that arose on its banks to the merchants that navigated its waters, and the way it came to occupy center stage in the History and culture of the subcontinent. Sen begins his chronicle in prehistoric India, tracing the river's first settlers, its myths of origin in the Hindu tradition, and its significance during the ascendancy of popular Buddhism. In the following centuries, Indian empires, Central Asian regimes, European merchants, the British Empire, and the Indian nation-state all shaped the identity and Ecology of the river. Weaving together geography, environmental politics, and Religious history, Sen offers in this lavishly illustrated volume a remarkable portrait of one of the world's largest and most densely populated river basins.

Rs. 1759.0

Red Flags – Why Xi`s China Is in Jeopardy

Red Flags – Why Xi`s China Is in Jeopardy

A trusted economic commentator provides a penetrating account of the threats to China's continued economic rise Under President Xi Jinping, China has become a large and confident power both at Home and abroad, but the country also faces serious challenges. In this critical take on China's future, economist George Magnus explores four key traps that China must confront and overcome in order to thrive: debt, middle income, the Renminbi, and an Aging population. Looking at the political direction President Xi Jinping is taking, Magnus argues that Xi's authoritarian and repressive Philosophy is ultimately not compatible with the country's economic aspirations. Thorough and well researched, the book also investigates the potential for conflicts over trade, China's evolving relationship with Trump, and the country's attempt to win influence and control in Eurasia through the Belt and Road initiative.

Rs. 1450.0

Empathy – A History

Empathy – A History

A surprising, sweeping, and deeply researched History of empathy-from late-nineteenth-century German Aesthetics to mirror neurons Empathy: A History tells the fascinating and largely unknown story of the first appearance of "empathy" in 1908 and tracks its shifting meanings over the following century. Despite empathy's ubiquity today, few realize that it began as a translation of Einfuhlung or "in-feeling" in German psychological Aesthetics that described how spectators projected their own feelings and movements into objects of art and nature. Remarkably, this early conception of empathy transformed into its opposite over the ensuing decades. Social scientists and Clinical psychologists refashioned empathy to require the deliberate putting aside of one's feelings to more accurately understand another's. By the end of World War II, interpersonal empathy entered the mainstream, appearing in Advice columns, popular Radio and TV, and later in public forums on civil rights. Even as neuroscientists continue to map the brain correlates of empathy, its many dimensions still elude strict Scientific description. This meticulously researched book uncovers empathy's Historical layers, offering a rich portrait of the tension between the reach of one's own imagination and the realities of others' experiences.

Rs. 1744.0

Fishing – How the Sea Fed Civilization

Fishing – How the Sea Fed Civilization

Humanity's last major source of Food from the wild, and how it enabled and shaped the growth of civilization In this History of fishing-not as Sport but as sustenance-archaeologist and best-selling author Brian Fagan argues that Fishing was an indispensable and often overlooked element in the growth of civilization. It sustainably provided enough Food to allow cities, nations, and empires to grow, but it did so with a different emphasis. Where Agriculture encouraged stability, Fishing demanded movement. It frequently required a search for new and better Fishing grounds; its technologies, centered on boats, facilitated movement and discovery; and fish themselves, when dried and salted, were the ideal food-lightweight, nutritious, and long-lasting-for traders, travelers, and conquering armies. This History of the long interaction of humans and seafood tours archaeological sites worldwide to show Readers how Fishing fed human settlement, rising social complexity, the development of cities, and ultimately the modern world.

Books published by Yale University Press at best prices | Best of Yale University Press (769 books)

Books published by Yale University Press at best prices | Best of Yale University Press (769 books) Price
Fundamentals of Physics I - Mechanics, Relativity, and Thermodynamics, Expanded Edition (Open Yale Courses) Rs. 995.0
Art & Its Histories - The Changing Status of the Artist V 2 (Paper) (Art and Its Histories Series) Rs. 20719.0
The Challenge of the Avant-Garde - Art & Its Histories Vol IV (Art and its Histories Series) Rs. 8448.3
Design - The Invention of Desire Rs. 1660.0
Aldo Rossi and the Spirit of Architecture Rs. 4505.0
Jihad - The Rise of Militant Islam in Central Asia Rs. 4090.0
From Jesus to Christ - The Origins of the New Testament Images of Jesus 2e (Yale Nota Bene) Rs. 901.0
Nature`s Giants – The Biology and Evolution of the World`s Largest Lifeforms Rs. 1938.0
Joe Louis – Hard Times Man Rs. 2609.45
Why Liberalism Failed (Politics and Culture Series) Rs. 994.0
Humour Rs. 1284.0
Culture in Nazi Germany Rs. 1874.0
A Little History of Archaeology (Little Histories) Rs. 796.0
The Club – Johnson, Boswell, and the Friends Who Shaped an Age Rs. 1540.0
Arabs – A 3,000–Year History of Peoples, Tribes and Empires Rs. 1905.0
The Shape of a Life – One Mathematician`s Search for the Universe`s Hidden Geometry Rs. 1620.0
Delayed Response – The Art of Waiting from the Ancient to the Instant World Rs. 1613.0
The Master and His Emissary – The Divided Brain and the Making of the Western World Rs. 1182.0
The Misinformation Age – How False Beliefs Spread Rs. 1506.0
Fiber – The Coming Tech Revolution and Why America Might Miss It Rs. 2038.0
Ganges – The Many Pasts of an Indian River Rs. 1759.0
Red Flags – Why Xi`s China Is in Jeopardy Rs. 1450.0
Empathy – A History Rs. 1744.0
Fishing – How the Sea Fed Civilization Rs. 930.0

Bot