Books published by OUP USA at best prices | Best of OUP USA (8602 books)

Cerebrovascular Disease (What Do I Do Now)

Cerebrovascular Disease (What Do I Do Now)

Part of the "What Do I Do Now?" series, Cerebrovascular Disease a case-based approach to cover common and important topics in the examination, investigation, and management of stroke, embolism, thrombosis, hemorrhage, and other critical presentations of cerebrovascular disease. Each chapter provides a discussion of the diagnosis, key points to remember, and selected references for further reading. For this edition, all cases and references have been updated and new cases have been added including: Ischemic stroke in cancer, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), primary angiitis of the central nervous system, symptomatic spinal vascular malformation, anoxic brain injury, and vascular dementia. Cerebrovascular Disease is an engaging collection of thought-provoking cases which clinicians can utilize when they encounter difficult patients. The volume is also a self-assessment tool that tests the reader's ability to answer the question, "What do I do now?"

New Urban Spaces: Urban Theory and the Scale Question

New Urban Spaces: Urban Theory and the Scale Question

The urban condition is today being radically transformed. Urban restructuring is accelerating, new urban spaces are being consolidated, and new forms of urbanization are crystallizing. In New Urban Spaces, Neil Brenner argues that understanding these mutations of urban life requires not only concrete research, but new theories of urbanization. To this end, Brenner proposes an approach that breaks with inherited conceptions of the urban as a bounded settlement unit-the city or the metropolis-and explores the multiscalar constitution and periodic rescaling of the capitalist urban fabric. Drawing on critical geopolitical economy and spatialized approaches to state theory, Brenner offers a paradigmatic account of how rescaling processes are transforming inherited formations of urban space and their variegated consequences for emergent patterns and pathways of urbanization. The book also advances an understanding of critical urban theory as radically revisable: key urban concepts must be continually reinvented in relation to the relentlessly mutating worlds of urbanization they aspire to illuminate.

Insurgent Universality: An Alternative Legacy of Modernity (Heretical Thought)

Insurgent Universality: An Alternative Legacy of Modernity (Heretical Thought)

Scholars commonly take the Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen of 1789, written during the French Revolution, as the starting point for the modern conception of human rights. According to the Declaration, the rights of man are held to be universal, at all times and all places. But as recent crises around migrants and refugees have made obvious, this idea, sacred as it might be among human rights advocates, is exhausted. It's long past time to reconsider the principles on which Western economic and political norms rest.

This book advocates for a tradition of political universality as an alternative to the juridical universalism of the Declaration. Insurgent universality isn't based on the idea that we all share some common humanity but, rather, on the democratic excess by which people disrupt and reject an existing political and economic order. Going beyond the constitutional armor of the representative state, it brings into play a plurality of powers to which citizens have access, not through the funnel of national citizenship but in daily political practice. We can look to recent history to see various experiments in cooperative and insurgent democracy: the Indignados in Spain, the Arab Spring, Occupy, the Zapatistas in Mexico, and, going further back, the Paris Commune, the 1917 peasant revolts during the Russian Revolution, and the Haitian Revolution. This book argues that these movements belong to the common legacy of insurgent universality, which is characterized by alternative trajectories of modernity that have been repressed, hindered, and forgotten. Massimiliano Tomba examines these events to show what they could have been and what they can still be. As such he explores how their common legacy can be reactivated. Insurgent Universality analyzes the manifestos and declarations that came out of these experiments considering them as collective works of an alternative canon of political theory that challenges the great names of the Western pantheon of political thought and builds bridges between European and non-European political and social experiments.

Rs. 2167.0

Clients and Constituents: Political Responsiveness in Patronage Democracies (Modern South Asia)

Clients and Constituents: Political Responsiveness in Patronage Democracies (Modern South Asia)

Scholars of distributive politics often emphasize partisanship and clientelism. However, as Jennifer Bussell demonstrates in Clients and Constituents, legislators in "patronage democracies" also provide substantial constituency service: non-contingent, direct assistance to individual citizens. Bussell shows how the uneven character of access to services at the local level-often due to biased allocation on the part of local intermediaries-generates demand for help from higher-level officials. The nature of these appeals in turn provides incentives for politicians to help their constituents obtain public benefits. Drawing on a new cross-national dataset and extensive evidence from India-including sustained qualitative shadowing of politicians, novel elite and citizen surveys, and an experimental audit study with a near census of Indian state and national legislators-this book provides a theoretical and empirical examination of political responsiveness in developing countries. It highlights the potential for an under-appreciated form of democratic accountability, one that is however rooted in the character of patronage-based politics.

Rs. 1914.0

The Twenty-four Hour Mind: The Role of Sleep and Dreaming in Our Emotional Lives

The Twenty-four Hour Mind: The Role of Sleep and Dreaming in Our Emotional Lives

In January of 1999, an otherwise nonviolent man under great stress at work brutally murdered his wife in their backyard. He then went back to bed, awakening only when police entered his home. He claimed to have no memory of the event because, while his body was awake at the time, his mind was not. He had been sleepwalking.

In The Twenty-four Hour Mind, sleep scientist Rosalind Cartwright brings together decades of research into the bizarre sleep disorders known as parasomnias to propose a new theory of how the human mind works consistently throughout waking and sleeping hours. Thanks to increasingly sophisticated EEG and brain imaging technologies, we now know that our minds do not simply "turn off" during sleep. Rather, they continue to be active, and research has indicated that one of the primary purposes of sleep is to aid in regulating emotions and processing experiences that occur during preceding waking hours. As such, when sleep is neurologically or genetically impaired or just too short, the processes that good sleep facilitates―those that usually have a positive effect on our mood and performance―can short circuit, with negative results that occasionally reach tragic proportions. Examining the interactions between conscious and unconscious forms of thinking as they proceed throughout the cycles of sleeping, dreaming, and waking, Cartwright demystifies the inner workings of the human mind that trigger sleep problems, how researchers are working to control them, and how they can apply what they learn to further our understanding of the brain. Along the way, she provides a lively account of the history of sleep research and the birth of sleep medicine that will initiate readers into this fascinating field of inquiry and the far-reaching implications it will have on the future of neuroscience. The Twenty-four Hour Mind offers a unique look at a relatively new area of study that will be of interest to those with and without sleep problems, as well as anyone captivated by the mysteries of the brain―and what sleep continues to teach us about the waking mind.

Rs. 1849.0

Antarctica: What Everyone Needs to Know®

Antarctica: What Everyone Needs to Know®

Part of the What Everyone Needs to Know® series, David Day's book on Antarctica examines the most forbidding and formidably inaccessible continent on Earth. Antarctica was first discovered by European explorers in 1820, and for over a century following this, countries competed for the frozen land's vast marine resources―namely, the skins and oil of seals and whales. Soon the entire territory played host to competing claims by rival nations. The Antarctic Treaty of 1959 was meant to end this contention, but countries have found other means of extending control over the land, with scientific bases establishing at least symbolic claims. Exploration and drilling by the United States, Great Britain, Russia, Japan, and others has led to discoveries about the world's climate in centuries past―and in the process intimations of its alarming future.

Delving into the history of the continent, Antarctic wildlife, arguments over governance, underwater mountain rangers, and the continent's use in predicting coming global change, Day's work sheds new light on a territory that, despite being the coldest, driest, and windiest continent in the world, will continue to be the object of intense speculation and competition.

The Arctic: What Everyone Needs to Know®

The Arctic: What Everyone Needs to Know®

As the threat of global climate change becomes a reality, many look to the Arctic Ocean to predict coming environmental phenomena. There, the consequences of Earth's warming trend are most immediately observable in the multi-year and perennial ice that has begun to melt, which threatens ice-dependent microorganisms and, eventually, will disrupt all of Arctic life.

In The Arctic: What Everyone Needs to Know®, Klaus Dodds and Mark Nuttall offer a concise introduction to the circumpolar North, focusing on its peoples, environment, resource development, conservation, and politics to provide critical information about how changes there can and will affect our entire globe and all of its inhabitants. Dodds and Nuttall shed light on how the Arctic's importance has grown over time, the region's role during the Cold War, indigenous communities and their history, and the past and future of the Arctic's governance, among other crucial topics. The Arctic is an essential primer for those seeking information about one of the most important regions in the world today.

A World Beyond Physics: The Emergence and Evolution of Life

A World Beyond Physics: The Emergence and Evolution of Life

How did life start? Is the evolution of life describable by any physics-like laws? Stuart Kauffman's latest book offers an explanation-beyond what the laws of physics can explain-of the progression from a complex chemical environment to molecular reproduction, metabolism and to early protocells, and further evolution to what we recognize as life. Among the estimated one hundred billion solar systems in the known universe, evolving life is surely abundant. That evolution is a process of "becoming" in each case. Since Newton, we have turned to physics to assess reality. But physics alone cannot tell us where we came from, how we arrived, and why our world has evolved past the point of unicellular organisms to an extremely complex biosphere.

Building on concepts from his work as a complex systems researcher at the Santa Fe Institute, Kauffman focuses in particular on the idea of cells constructing themselves and introduces concepts such as "constraint closure." Living systems are defined by the concept of "organization" which has not been focused on in enough in previous works. Cells are autopoetic systems that build themselves: they literally construct their own constraints on the release of energy into a few degrees of freedom that constitutes the very thermodynamic work by which they build their own self creating constraints. Living cells are "machines" that construct and assemble their own working parts. The emergence of such systems-the origin of life problem-was probably a spontaneous phase transition to self-reproduction in complex enough prebiotic systems. The resulting protocells were capable of Darwin's heritable variation, hence open-ended evolution by natural selection. Evolution propagates this burgeoning organization. Evolving living creatures, by existing, create new niches into which yet further new creatures can emerge. If life is abundant in the universe, this self-constructing, propagating, exploding diversity takes us beyond physics to biospheres everywhere.

Rs. 1640.0

The Cell: A Molecular Approach

The Cell: A Molecular Approach

Even the most experienced instructor can find teaching cell biology daunting, and most cell biology texts are bogged down in detail or background information. Lost in all the details are the more fascinating material and contemporary advances that represent this rapidly moving field. With so much to cover, creating a classroom around active learning may be difficult or nearly impossible.

The Cell: A Molecular Approach endeavors to address those issues with succinct writing, incorporation of current research, a test bank that encourages critical thinking, and an active learning framework.

With just enough detail for a one-semester, junior level course, the text presents fundamental concepts and current research, including chapters on genomics and transcriptional regulation and epigenetics, and new in-text boxed features on molecular medicine and key experiments. For instructors who want to flip their classrooms or just get students more engaged, The Cell: A Molecular Approach is the only cell biology text that is accompanied by an Active Learning Guide. This chapter-by-chapter playbook shows instructors how to create a dynamic learning environment with in-class exercises, clicker questions, and links to relevant media, animations, testing, and self-quizzing, all aligned with the new in-text learning objectives, wherever appropriate.

This text provides the right level of detail, student engagement, and instructor support for the modern cell biology classroom.

Rs. 7000.0

Genetic Counseling Research: A Practical Guide (Genetic Counseling in Practice)

Genetic Counseling Research: A Practical Guide (Genetic Counseling in Practice)

Genetic Counseling Research: A Practical Guide is the first text devoted to research methodology in genetic counseling. This text offers step-by-step guidance for conducting research, from the development of a question to the publication of findings. Genetic counseling examples, user-friendly worksheets, and practical tips guide readers through the research and publication processes.

With a highly accessible, pedagogical approach, this book will help promote quality research by genetic counselors and research supervisors―and in turn, increase the knowledge base for genetic counseling practice, other aspects of genetic counseling service delivery, and professional education. It will be an invaluable resource to the next generation of genetic counseling and its surrounding disciplines.

Rs. 4541.0

Spending Time: The Most Valuable Resource

Spending Time: The Most Valuable Resource

Time is the ultimate scarce resource and thus quintessentially a topic for economics, ths study of scarcity. Starting with the observation that time is increasingly valuable given competing demands as we have more things we can buyand do, Spending Time provides engaging insights into how people use their time and what determines their decisions about spending their time.

That our time is limited by the number of hours in a day, days in a year, and years in our lives means that we face constraints and thus choices that involve trade-offs. We sleep, eat, have fun, watch TV, and not least we work. How much we dedicate to each, and why we do so, is intriguining and no one is better placed to shed light on similarities and differences than Daniel S. Hamermesh, the leading authority on time-use. Here he explores how people use their time, including across countries, regions, cultures, class, and gender.

Americans now work more than people in other rich countries, but as recently as the late 1970s they worked no more than others; and they also work longer into older age. Men and women do different things at different times of the day, which affects how well-off they feel. Both the arrival of children and retirement create major shocks to existing time uses, with differences between the sexes. Higher incomes and higher wage rates lead people to hurry more, both on and off the job, and higher wage rates lead people to cut back on activities that take time away from work.

Being stressed for time is central to modern life, and Hamermesh shows who is rushed, and why. With Americans working more than people in France, Germany, the U.K., Japan and other rich countries, the book offers a simple but radical proposal for changing Americans' lives and reducing the stress about time.

Rs. 1170.0

Urban Health

Urban Health

An essential collection that advances our understanding of how cities influence our health

More than half the world's population lives in cities ― a figure that will grow to two-thirds by 2030. As global populations rapidly consolidate around urban centers, the scientific understanding of what this means for human health faces a new and greater urgency.

Urban Health connects urban exposures ― the experiences, choices, and behaviors shaped by living in a city ― to their impact on population health. By using the ubiquitous aspects of the urban experience as a lens to study these exposures across borders and demographics, it offers a new, scalable framework for understanding health and disease. Its applications to public health, epidemiology, and social science are virtually unlimited.

Enriched with case studies that consider the state of health in cities all over the world, this book does more than capture the state of a nascent field; it holds a critical mirror to itself, considering the next decade and arming a new generation with the tools for research and practice.

Rs. 4283.0

Antibiotics: What Everyone Needs to Know®

Antibiotics: What Everyone Needs to Know®

A STIRRING EXAMINATION OF A LOOMING CRISIS

Virtually everyone has taken antibiotics. They can be lifesavers ― or they can be useless. But what are they? How are they used? And what happens as the effectiveness of antibiotics begins to decline?

Antibiotics: What Everyone Needs to Know® examines the personal and societal implications of our planet's most important ― and arguably most overused ― medications. In a question-and-answer format, it unpacks the most complicated aspects of this issue, including:

· How antibiotics are used (and overused) in humans, plants, and livestock
· The consequences to date, and the potential crisis ahead, as overuse of existing antibiotics breeds new resistance in bacteria
· How the globalized world enables antibiotic resistance more quickly
· Collateral damage, individually and societally, of antibiotic use
· The difficult decisions ahead related to medical care and the food system

Grounded in the latest scientific research and translated for general readers, Antibiotics: What Everyone Needs to Know® offers a clear-eyed overview of where we are, and what the future holds, as antibiotics lose their might.

Rs. 10510.0

Antibiotics: What Everyone Needs to Know®

Antibiotics: What Everyone Needs to Know®

A STIRRING EXAMINATION OF A LOOMING CRISIS

Virtually everyone has taken antibiotics. They can be lifesavers ― or they can be useless. But what are they? How are they used? And what happens as the effectiveness of antibiotics begins to decline?

Antibiotics: What Everyone Needs to Know® examines the personal and societal implications of our planet's most important ― and arguably most overused ― medications. In a question-and-answer format, it unpacks the most complicated aspects of this issue, including:

· How antibiotics are used (and overused) in humans, plants, and livestock
· The consequences to date, and the potential crisis ahead, as overuse of existing antibiotics breeds new resistance in bacteria
· How the globalized world enables antibiotic resistance more quickly
· Collateral damage, individually and societally, of antibiotic use
· The difficult decisions ahead related to medical care and the food system

Grounded in the latest scientific research and translated for general readers, Antibiotics: What Everyone Needs to Know® offers a clear-eyed overview of where we are, and what the future holds, as antibiotics lose their might.

Behavioral Finance: What Everyone Needs to Know®

Behavioral Finance: What Everyone Needs to Know®

People tend to be penny wise and pound foolish and cry over spilt milk, even though we are taught to do neither. Focusing on the present at the expense of the future and basing decisions on lost value are two mistakes common to decision-making that are particularly costly in the world of finance.

Behavioral Finance: What Everyone Needs to KnowR provides an overview of common shortcuts and mistakes people make in managing their finances. It covers the common cognitive biases or errors that occur when people are collecting, processing, and interpreting information. These include emotional biases and the influence of social factors, from culture to the behavior of one's peers. These effects vary during one's life, reflecting differences in due to age, experience, and gender.

Among the questions to be addressed are: How did the financial crisis of 2007-2008 spur understanding human behavior? What are market anomalies and how do they relate to behavioral biases? What role does overconfidence play in financial decision- making? And how does getting older affect risk tolerance?

Ennio Morricone: In His Own Words

Ennio Morricone: In His Own Words

Master composer Ennio Morricone's scores go hand-in-hand with the idea of the Western film. Often considered the world's greatest living film composer, and most widely known for his innovative scores to The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly and the other Sergio Leone's movies, The Mission, Cinema Paradiso and more recently, The Hateful Eight, Morricone has spent the past 60 years reinventing the sound of cinema. In Ennio Morricone: In His Own Words, composers Ennio Morricone and Alessandro De Rosa present a years-long discussion of life, music, and the marvelous and unpredictable ways that the two come into contact with and influence each other. The result is what Morricone himself defines: "beyond a shadow of a doubt the best book ever written about me, the most authentic, the most detailed and well curated. The truest."

Opening for the first time the door of his creative laboratory, Morricone offers an exhaustive and rich account of his life, from his early years of study to genre-defining collaborations with the most important Italian and international directors, including Leone, Bertolucci, Pasolini, Argento, Tornatore, Malick, Carpenter, Stone, Nichols, De Palma, Beatty, Levinson, Almodóvar, Polanski and Tarantino. In the process, Morricone unveils the curious relationship that links music and images in cinema, as well as the creative urgency at the foundation of his experimentations with "absolute music". Throughout these conversations with De Rosa, Morricone dispenses invaluable insights not only on composing but also on the broader process of adaptation and what it means to be human. As he reminds us, "Coming into contact with memories doesn't only entail the melancholy of something that slips away with time, but also looking forward, understanding who I am now. And who knows what else may still happen."

Rs. 2145.0

Niedermeyer's Electroencephalography: Basic Principles, Clinical Applications, and Related Fields

Niedermeyer's Electroencephalography: Basic Principles, Clinical Applications, and Related Fields

Niedermeyer's Electroencephalography: Basic Principles, Clinical Applications, and Related Fields, Seventh Edition keeps the clinical neurophysiologist on the forefront of medical advancements. This authoritative text covers basic neurophysiology, neuroanatomy, and neuroimaging to provide a better understanding of clinical neurophysiological findings. This edition further delves into current state-of-the-art recording EEG activity both in the normal clinical environment and unique situations such as the intensive care unit, operating rooms, and epilepsy monitoring suites. As computer technology evolves, so does the integration of analytical methods that significantly affect the reader's interpretations of waveforms and trends that are occurring on long-term monitoring sessions.

Compiled and edited by Donald L. Schomer and Fernando H. Lopes da Silva, along with a global team of experts, they collectively bring insight to crucial sections including basic principles of EEG and MEG, normal EEG, EEG in a clinical setting, clinical EEG in seizures and epilepsy, complementary and special techniques, event-related EEG phenomena, and shed light on the future of EEG and clinical neurophysiology. Akin to an encyclopedia of everything EEG, this comprehensive work is perfect for neurophysiology fellows, as well as neurology, neurosurgery, and general medical residents, and for the interns and medical students, and is a one-stop-shop for anyone training in EEG or preparing for neurophysiology or epilepsy board exams.

Rs. 14217.51

Was the Cat in the Hat Black?: The Hidden Racism of Children's Literature, and the Need for Diverse Books

Was the Cat in the Hat Black?: The Hidden Racism of Children's Literature, and the Need for Diverse Books

Racism is resilient, duplicitous, and endlessly adaptable, so it is no surprise that America is again in a period of civil rights activism. A significant reason racism endures is because it is structural: it's embedded in culture and in institutions. One of the places that racism hides-and thus perhaps the best place to oppose it-is books for young people.

Was the Cat in the Hat Black? presents five serious critiques of the history and current state of children's literature tempestuous relationship with both implicit and explicit forms of racism. The book fearlessly examines topics both vivid-such as The Cat in the Hat's roots in blackface minstrelsy-and more opaque, like how the children's book industry can perpetuate structural racism via whitewashed covers even while making efforts to increase diversity. Rooted in research yet written with a lively, crackling touch, Nel delves into years of literary criticism and recent sociological data in order to show a better way forward. Though much of what is proposed here could be endlessly argued, the knowledge that what we learn in childhood imparts both subtle and explicit lessons about whose lives matter is not debatable. The text concludes with a short and stark proposal of actions everyone-reader, author, publisher, scholar, citizen- can take to fight the biases and prejudices that infect children's literature. While Was the Cat in the Hat Black? does not assume it has all the answers to such a deeply systemic problem, its audacity should stimulate discussion and activism.

Rs. 1399.0

Bartlett's Medical Management of HIV Infection

Bartlett's Medical Management of HIV Infection

THE PIONEERING WORK IN HIV MEDICINE, COMPLETELY REVISED FOR THE FIRST TIME SINCE 2012

The 17th edition of Bartlett's Medical Management of HIV Infection offers the best-available clinical guidance for treatment of patients with HIV. Edited by preeminent and pioneering authorities in HIV research and clinical care, it has earned its status as the definitive work for physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, pharmacists, and anyone working in the care of persons with HIV.

Updated to reflect the most recent innovations in HIV prevention and therapy, this text balances new and old approaches to produce a guide to clinical management in any setting. Coverage includes:

· New approaches to prevention of HIV and prevention of infection in patients with HIV
· Laboratory protocols for screening and treatment
· Antiretroviral therapies (including dosage and adverse effects and drug interactions )
· HIV treatment in resource-limited settings
· Management of infections

A portable, navigable guide to an exquisitely complex field, Bartlett's Medical Management of HIV Infection is the continuing standard for practice and education in the field of HIV.

Rs. 2119.0

Well-Mannered Medicine: Medical Ethics and Etiquette in Classical Ayurveda

Well-Mannered Medicine: Medical Ethics and Etiquette in Classical Ayurveda

Dagmar Wujastyk explores the moral discourses on the practice of medicine in the foundational texts of Ayurveda. The classical ayurvedic treatises were composed in Sanskrit between the first and the fifth centuries CE, and the later works, dating into the sixteenth century CE, were still considered strongly authoritative. As Wujastyk shows, these works testify to an elaborate system of medical ethics and etiquette.

Physicians looked to the ayurvedic treatises for a guide to professional conduct. Ayurvedic discourses on good medical practice depict the physician as highly-educated, skilled, moral, and well-mannered. The rules of conduct positioned physicians within mainstream society's and characterized medical practice as a trustworthy and socially acceptable profession. At the same time, professional success was largely based on a particular physician's ability to cure his patients. This resulted in tension, as some treatments and medications were considered socially or religiously unacceptable. Doctors needed to treat their patients successfully while ostensibly following the rules of acceptable behavior.

Wujastyk offers insight into the many unorthodox methods of avoiding conflict while ensuring patient compliance shown in the ayurvedic treatises, giving a disarmingly candid perspective on the realities of medical practice and its crucial role in a profoundly well-mannered society.

Rs. 1509.0

Navigating Life with Parkinson's Disease (Brain and Life Books)

Navigating Life with Parkinson's Disease (Brain and Life Books)

The American Academy of Neurology's (AAN) Neurology Now Books series answer the questions and concerns of patients and caregivers with specific neurologic diseases who are navigating a host of issues related to living-often long-term-with a neurologic illness.

Navigating Life with Parkinson's Disease is a guide for anyone affected by Parkinson's―patients, family members, friends, and caregivers. Containing the most up-to-date information on the disease, one of the most common nervous system diseases, it also discusses the available treatments and provides practical advice on how to manage the disease in the long term. Emphasizing life-style adjustments that will provide a better quality of life and moderate the burden for patients and their loved ones, Navigating Life with Parkinson's Disease answers many questions and clarifies misunderstandings regarding the disease.

While addressing all the relevant aspects of the disease, the authors do so in a manner that is approachable and easily understandable. Question and answer sections are provided, while "hot topics" are called out for easy visibility. The authors have also included true patient stories that will both inspire and instruct. The authors have also taken care to address several topics often not mentioned in physician-directed disease management, such as how to talk to family and friends about one's life with Parkinson's; what role the care partner can play, and what is the best way to help a loved one without facing burnout.

Promoting the patient-centered, multi- and multidisciplinary model of chronic disease management, Navigating Life with Parkinson's Disease empowers patients and their families with the necessary information to take charge of their health care.

Rs. 1179.0

Perceptual Learning: The Flexibility of the Senses (Philosophy of Mind Series)

Perceptual Learning: The Flexibility of the Senses (Philosophy of Mind Series)

Experts from wine tasters to radiologists to bird watchers have all undergone perceptual learning-long-term changes in perception that result from practice or experience. Philosophers have been discussing such cases for centuries, from the 14th-century Indian philosopher Vedanta Desika to the 18th-century Scottish philosopher Thomas Reid, and into contemporary times.

This book uses recent evidence from psychology and neuroscience to show that perceptual learning is genuinely perceptual, rather than post-perceptual. It also offers a taxonomy for classifying cases in the philosophical literature. In some cases, perceptual learning involves changes in how one attends; in other cases, it involves a learned ability to differentiate two properties, or to perceive two properties as unified. Connolly uses this taxonomy to rethink several domains of perception in terms of perceptual learning, including multisensory perception, color perception, and speech perception.

As a whole, the book offers a theory of the function of perceptual learning. Perceptual learning embeds into our quick perceptual systems what would be a slower task were it to be done in a controlled, cognitive manner. A novice wine taster drinking a Cabernet Sauvignon might have to think about its features first and then infer the type of wine, while an expert can identify it immediately. This learned ability to immediately identify the wine enables the expert to think about other things like the vineyard or the vintage of the wine. More generally, perceptual learning serves to free up cognitive resources for other tasks. This book offers a comprehensive empirically-informed account, and explores the nature, scope, and theoretical implications of perceptual learning.

Rs. 5070.0

The Ideas That Made America: A Brief History

The Ideas That Made America: A Brief History

Long before the United States was a nation, it was a set of ideas, projected onto the New World by European explorers with centuries of belief and thought in tow. From this foundation of expectation and experience, America and American thought grew in turn, enriched by the bounties of the Enlightenment, the philosophies of liberty and individuality, the tenets of religion, and the doctrines of republicanism and democracy. Crucial to this development were the thinkers who nurtured it, from Thomas Jefferson to Ralph Waldo Emerson, W.E.B. DuBois to Jane Addams, and Betty Friedan to Richard Rorty. The Ideas That Made America: A Brief History traces how Americans have addressed the issues and events of their time and place, whether the Civil War, the Great Depression, or the culture wars of today.

Spanning a variety of disciplines, from religion, philosophy, and political thought, to cultural criticism, social theory, and the arts, Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen shows how ideas have been major forces in American history, driving movements such as transcendentalism, Social Darwinism, conservatism, and postmodernism. In engaging and accessible prose, this introduction to American thought considers how notions about freedom and belonging, the market and morality ― and even truth ― have commanded generations of Americans and been the cause of fierce debate.

The Burden of Sympathy: How Families Cope With Mental Illness

The Burden of Sympathy: How Families Cope With Mental Illness

What are the limits of sympathy in dealing with another person's troubles? Where do we draw the line between caring for a loved one, and being swallowed up emotionally by the obligation to do so? Quite simply, what do we owe each other? In this vivid and thoughtful study, David Karp chronicles the experiences of the family members of the mentally ill, and how they draw "boundaries of sympathy" to avoid being engulfed by the day-to-day suffering of a loved one.
Working from sixty extensive interviews, the author reveals striking similarities in the experiences of caregivers: the feelings of shame, fear, guilt and powerlessness in the face of a socially stigmatized illness; the frustration of navigating the complex network of bureaucracies that govern the mental health system; and most of all, the difficulty negotiating an "appropriate" level of involvement with the mentally ill loved one while maintaining enough distance for personal health. Throughout the narratives, Karp sensitively explores the overarching question of how people strike an equilibrium between reason and emotion, between head and heart, when caring for a catastrophically ill person. The Burden of Sympathy concludes with a critical look at what it means to be a moral and caring person at the turn of the century in America, when powerful cultural messages spell out two contradictory imperatives: pursue personal fulfillment at any cost and care for the family at any cost.
An insightful, deeply caring look at mental illness and at the larger picture of contemporary values, The Burden of Sympathy is required reading for caregivers of all kinds, and for anyone seeking broader understanding of human responsibility in the postmodern world.

Rs. 5170.75

Books published by OUP USA at best prices | Best of OUP USA (8602 books)

Books published by OUP USA at best prices | Best of OUP USA (8602 books) Price
Cerebrovascular Disease (What Do I Do Now) Rs. 899.0
New Urban Spaces: Urban Theory and the Scale Question
Insurgent Universality: An Alternative Legacy of Modernity (Heretical Thought) Rs. 2167.0
Clients and Constituents: Political Responsiveness in Patronage Democracies (Modern South Asia) Rs. 1914.0
The Twenty-four Hour Mind: The Role of Sleep and Dreaming in Our Emotional Lives Rs. 1849.0
Antarctica: What Everyone Needs to Know® Rs. 753.0
The Arctic: What Everyone Needs to Know® Rs. 759.0
A World Beyond Physics: The Emergence and Evolution of Life Rs. 1640.0
The Cell: A Molecular Approach Rs. 7000.0
Genetic Counseling Research: A Practical Guide (Genetic Counseling in Practice) Rs. 4541.0
Spending Time: The Most Valuable Resource Rs. 1170.0
Urban Health Rs. 4283.0
Antibiotics: What Everyone Needs to Know® Rs. 10510.0
Antibiotics: What Everyone Needs to Know® Rs. 981.0
Behavioral Finance: What Everyone Needs to Know® Rs. 755.0
Ennio Morricone: In His Own Words Rs. 2145.0
Niedermeyer's Electroencephalography: Basic Principles, Clinical Applications, and Related Fields Rs. 14217.51
Was the Cat in the Hat Black?: The Hidden Racism of Children's Literature, and the Need for Diverse Books Rs. 1399.0
Bartlett's Medical Management of HIV Infection Rs. 2119.0
Well-Mannered Medicine: Medical Ethics and Etiquette in Classical Ayurveda Rs. 1509.0
Navigating Life with Parkinson's Disease (Brain and Life Books) Rs. 1179.0
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